Which dog would suit your lifestyle?

If you, like many, plan on adding a dog to your family, you may be wondering what breed would best suit your lifestyle. From happy-go-lucky, to brave or even timid – each potential owner will likely have something in mind.

However, it’s important to do your due diligence and consider what dog may be best for your lifestyle. With a puppy boom, we have also seen an increase in the number of dogs given to shelters, most likely due to having the wrong dog in the wrong home.

A recent survey done by National Accident Helpline found that 87% of Brits find their pets keep them calm during stressful situations. So it’s no wonder that over the past year many of us have acquired a new pet for moral support.

To help you decide which dog would be best suited to your family, we’ve rounded up some things to consider when selecting your new pooch.

Factors to think about:

1. Exercise requirements

First and foremost, think about how active you are. In general, if you prefer to spend your evenings snuggled up on the sofa, getting a really active dog (such as a husky) may not work out so well.

When thinking about which dog breed to get, try to evaluate your activity levels honestly. If you’re a keen runner or enjoy long hikes, then you may be the perfect fit for a dog with high activity levels.

2. Noise

If you live in an apartment, noise could be an issue. When choosing your dog, try to keep in mind how vocal each breed is.

Although you may want a German Shepherd – it may not be the best breed if you have neighbors in close proximity.

3. Does the dog want to be cuddled?

Some dogs are independent by nature, so if you want your furry friend to always be on hand for a cuddle, a working line dog may not be for you. Overall, show line dogs or smaller dogs that require less exercise are happier to cuddle their owners.

4. Time & money

Another crucial factor to look out for is how much time and money you can dedicate to your pets. A dog is for life and not just for Christmas, so it’s important that if you’re getting a dog, you have the time and money to look after it.

It’s estimated that dog ownership can cost up to £30,800 over its lifetime, so you need to make sure you are financially stable before committing to a dog. Not only this, but you’ll need to make sure you have adequate time to exercise and train your dog, to ensure it has a nice life.

The bottom line

Although dogs bring a lot to our lives, it’s important to think long and hard about which breed is best suited to your lifestyle. A dog is a lifelong commitment, so it’s best to take the time to get it right.

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